Participants

About the participants

0 %
young people ages 18-24
1 %
Black, Indigenous, People of Color
1 %
EARNED LESS THAN 36K/YEAR
1 %
people with disabilities

This section includes data about the characteristics of survey participants by age, gender identity, racial and ethnic identity, age, income, housing, access to formal education, and disability. We highlight relative disadvantages among participants that can contribute to health inequities, such as low incomes and housing insecurity. We also include relative advantages, like higher rates of formal education compared to the general public in Los Angeles County.

gender IDENTITY

PREFERRED terms

Participants selected from a list of 19 possible gender identity terms or wrote in terms. The first questions asked about all the terms participants used for their gender. The second questions asked about about their most preferred term.

 

Transmasculine is used in this report as a general encompassing political term. About 54% of survey participants said they used the term transmasculine for their own gender and only 14% preferred it.

There was considerable diversity and overlap in terms used by survey participants.

About 1 in 3 used terms like man, trans man, or ftm. Many of these same participants also used terms like non-binary, genderqueer, or gender non-conforming. About 1 in 4 preferred terms like non-binary, genderqueer, gender fluid, or gender non-conforming; yet, some of these participants also used terms like trans man. Another 17% preferred simply trans or transgender.

Some did not identify with any of the terms listed and wrote in other words they preferred.

ALL THE terms
transgender
71%
trans
68%
trans masculine
54%
trans man
48%
ftm
44%
non-binary
40%
man or male
36%
gender non-conforming
32%
genderqueer
32%
trans*
22%
gender fluid
10%
boi
9%
MOST preferred term
trans man
19%
trans masculine
14%
non-binary
14%
man or male
11%
trans
10%
genderqueer
8%
transgender
7%
ftm
3%
gender nonconforming
3%

agender, androgyne, Androgynous, bear cub, bigender, Boi, boy, butch, demiboy, dude, earth mother, femme, femme boi, fluidflux, gay, guy, gender non-compliant, gender variant, genderfluid, genderflux, genderfuck, intersexman of trans experience, neutrois, non-binary transmasculine, queer, queer bodied, shape shifter, stud, third-gender, trans guy, trans male, transgender man, transsexual, two-spirit, woman or female.

Not everyone who appears to be trans masculine identifies as male or even masculine. Always ask about and honor pronouns. If you're unsure, just use the person's name.

TMSHRJ:LA survey participant​

TMSHRJ:LA survey participant​

Identification documents

We asked participants about their gender marker on various forms of state identification. Mandatory gender markers on identification paperwork can create significant inequities for TGI people.

MARKER IS ‘M’

state identification or driver license
40%
social security records
35%
health insurance
35%
immigration documents
18%
birth certificate
12%

MARKER IS ‘F’

state identification or driver license
60%
social security records
65%
health insurance
65%
immigration documents
82%
birth certificate
88%

 Many Transmsaculine people are unable or do not want to change their
documents. This may be due to prohibitive costs, administrative
barriers, immigration status, concerns about discrimination, not having a
‘male’ gender identity, fears of future incarceration, and many other
reasons. The survey was conducted before the passage of the Gender Recognition Act in California which now allows people to change the gender marker on their state identification to X.

RACIAL and ETHNIC identity

Racial / ethnic categories

We asked participants to select all racial or ethnic group identities. Participants could also write in their racial or ethnic identity. 

0 %
Black, Indigenous, People of Color

We use the term Black, Indigenous, People of Color (BIPOC) as a political category of analysis in this report. We included all participants who identified as anything other than (or in addition to) white.

Many survey participants selected more than one category and/or selected bi-racial/multi-racial/mixed.

About one-quarter of our survey participants selected Latinx/Hispanic, which compares to about 45% of the general population in Los Angeles County. This difference may be due in part to differences in how we asked this question, but it also likely reflects an unintended bias in our outreach. This includes that our outreach and survey was conducted in English only.

 

SELECT ALL that apply
American indian / Native American
5%
Asian & Pacific Islander & Native Hawaiian (A&PI&NH)
14%
Black/African American
11%
Latinx/Chicanx/Hispanic
26%
Middle Eastern/North African
4%
bi-racial/multi-racial/Mixed
10%
white
52%

Asian mix, Black and Mexican, Black Indigenous, black/filipino, brown, Cantonese, Chicano, Chicanx, chinese, Chinese-Thai, Desi, Eastern European Jew, Filipino, Filipinx, Greek, Hispanic, I’m a mutt, Proud Mexican, Iranian American, Japanese and Black, Jewish, Mestizx, Mutt, Mexican, mixed, Mixed, Mixed European Decent, Mixed race. Hispanic. Mixed/Hapa, multi-ethnic, Multiracial, Native/Indigenous, Polish, Portuguese, Salvadoran, Salvadoreñx indigenx, Salvadorian American, Scottish/Cherokee, South Asian, Taiwanese American, Tamil Sri Lankan, Vietnamese, white ashkenazi jew, White Jewish, White passing Jewish, Syrian, European and Romani, xicanx.

BIPOC

LOOK FOR THE FIST. We use this symbol in this report wherever we found statistically significant differences in the responses of participants who were Black, Indigenous, People Of Color (BIPOC) those who were white. This is one way to try to highlight how racism and xenophobia additionally impact Transmasculine health and health care experiences. Our intention is to inform advocacy at the intersections of trans health and racial justice.

Immigration history

We asked participants if they identified as an Immigrant to the united States

0 %
identified as an immigrant to the united states

OF THOSE WHO IMMIGRATED TO THE UNITED STATES (INCLUDES MULTIPLE SELECTION)

AGE

We asked participants their age in years. Only participants who were 18 or older were eligible to take the survey. 

participants ranged from age 18 to 67

Participants were younger than the general population in Los Angeles County. National research suggests that younger people are more likely to identify as trans and gender nonconforming. This might also reflect an unintended bias in our outreach toward younger participants.

age 18-24
27%
ages 25-29
30%
ages 30-34
20%
ages 35-44
19%
Ages 45+
4%

INCOME

Annual income

We asked participants about their annual incomes and whether they were supporting financial dependents.

0 %
supported one or more dependents

Most survey participants reported a low to extremely low income for LA County.  At the time of the survey, a single person in Los Angeles County with income less than $50,500 qualified as low income for federal housing programs.

Under $12,000
32%
$12,000-$35,999
37%
$36,000-$59,999
17%
$60,000+
14%

income source

We asked participants about their current source(s) of income. Many selected multiple options.

Full-time employment
45%
Part-time employment
29%
Family support
15%
Self-employed
13%
public assistance
11%
Student loans, grants, fellowships
10%
Cash jobs (e.g. childcare, domestic labor, sex work, etc.)
10%
BIPOC

About 1 in 5 white participants received some form of income support from family members compared to about 1 in 10 BIPOC participants

RECEIVED INCOME SUPPORT FROM FAMILY

BIPOC
10%
WHITE
20%

HOUSING & History of homelessness

Current housing

We asked participants about the kind of housing they stay most nights, including whether they owned or rented their home or if they stayed with family or friends who paid the rent.

0 %
owned thier home

Most participants had housing at the time of the survey. However, more than 1 in 4 participants lived with family members, partners, or friends who paid the rent. Having a support network is a huge health benefit. However, being reliant on others for shelter can also contribute to vulnerabilities for some.

Few participants were homeowners. An estimated 64% of households are rented in Los Angeles. However, among survey participants who either rented or owned a home, 90% of these households were rented.

THe PLACE YOU STAY MOST NIGHTS

RENT A HOUSE OR APT (including with roommates)
62%
OWN A HOUSE OR APT
7%
Stay with family members
23%
Stay with A partner or friends that pay for the housing
4%
shelter or transitional housing
1%
hotel, motel, single-occupancy
1%
other spots (e.g, car, boat, camping, couches, etc.)
3%

history of homelessness

We asked participants about their prior experiences staying in shelters or living on the streets/camping due to homelessness.

0 %
history of homelessness
has stayed in a domestic violence shelter
2%
has stayed in a transitional living program
2%
has stayed in a homeless shelter
7%
living on the street or camping due to homelessness
15%
BIPOC

A greater portion of BIPOC participants had experienced homelessness in their lifetimes compared to white participants. 

HISTORY OF HOMELESSNESS

BIPOC
25%
WHITE
14%
I am in a different place every couple of weeks, housesitting, petsitting or staying with friends (post divorce after transitioning).

TMSHRJ:LA survey participant​

TMSHRJ:LA survey participant​

EDUCATION

formal education

We asked participants about whether they had a high school degree, attended college, had a four year degree or had a graduate degree.

0 %
4-year college degree (age 25+)

Participants had high levels of formal education. Nearly two-thirds of participants (ages 25+) had a 4-year college degree (63%), a figure that is nearly double the portion of the general population of Los Angeles County (ages 25+) with a four-year college degree (32%). This is consistent with national evidence that a greater portion of trans people attain college degrees than those in the general population. This may also reflect a sampling bias toward participants with greater levels of formal education.

Graduate degree
19%
Four year degree
33%
Some college or vocational school
38%
High school, GED or less
9%
BIPOC

Fewer BIPOC had a 4-year degree. About 55% of BIPOC participants over age 25 had a 4-year college degree compared to 75% of white participants over 25. Both percentages exceed comparative figures in the general population in Los Angeles County.

HAS A FOUR YEAR COLLEGE DEGREE

WHITE
75%
BIPOC
55%

disability

identifies as having a disability

We asked participants about whether they identified as having a disability and included an  write in box for optional description.

0 %
identified as having a disability

ADD, ADHD, anxiety, anxiety disorder, Arthritis, autistic person, Autistic Spectrum, Bipolar, Central auditory processing disorder,
chronic cyclic depression, chronic illness, degenerative disc disease & associated chronic pain,  depression, dyslexia, hearing loss, I am physically disabled, I have major depressive disorder, IBS, I stutter, learning disability, PTSD, Major Depression, manic depressive, Mental health difference,  multiple sclerosis, Mentally Ill, Invisible Physical Disability, Mobility impairment, Non Verbal Learning Disability, orthopedic, Psychiatric, PTSD, reading disability, schizoaffective disorder.

 

Data findings & visualizations

OUr partners